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Welcome - Wile's Lake Farm Market Newsletter
eNewsletter Issue 314 | July 16, 2014

Popsicles, fireflies and days at the lake are just a few of the fun things to enjoy during the lazy, hazy hot days of summer.  It’s also the time of year to dine on fresh from the garden fruit and vegetables.  Whether it’s a barbeque in the backyard or a weekend by the lake, summer entertaining should be as fun and carefree for the hosts as it is for the guests.  Rely on our Market to provide you with the latest in locally grown fruits, vegetables and baked good for your special mealtimes.

In This Issue:
HODGE PODGE
CLOSE TO HOME DINNER
NEW ARRIVAL IN GIFTWARE
PERENNIAL OF THE WEEK
FLOWERING SHRUB OF THE WEEK
GARDEN INVADERS
ELSPETH'S GARDEN CLASSROOM
RECIPE OF THE WEEK
SUMMER INSPIRATION

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HODGE PODGE

If you didn’t have time or space for a vegetable patch—stop at the Market and fill your basket with items to take you through meals that can be quick and easy, nutritious and delicious.  Be sure to include the South Shore favourite---HODGE PODGE—we have all the fixin’s and Peter’s recipe is found on our Recipe Website page.  Our selection includes yellow beans, shell peas, bunch carrots and new potatoes.  Picture all that swimming in butter and cream and you have a feast fit for kings and queens of all ages.

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CLOSE TO HOME DINNER

The third annual Close to Home Dinner, part of the Growing Green Festival will be held in our Market Greenhouse on Thursday, August 21 at 6pm.  The buffet style meal provided by Matthew Krizan of Mateus Bistro is a mixed grill including goat.  Tickets are $35.00 each and are available at the Market.

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NEW ARRIVAL IN GIFTWARE

The popularity of purses continues to grow, and we are pleased to have received a new shipment of the latest styles---check them out this week for best selection!

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PERENNIAL OF THE WEEK

“Miscanthus Sinensis Strictus”—Porcupine Grass

Continuing with our featured non-invasive ornamental grasses,   Porcupine Grass is so named because of its upright mounding habit with yellow horizontal bands on its leaves.  Copper colored flowers bloom in the fall, drying to a fluffy tan color for winter interest.

 ‘Giant Silver Grass”

I you have an area where you need separation the Giant Silver Grass with its corn like stalk grows to a height of 10 feet, with arching tips to create a living screen.  While it tolerates moderate drought, it is also happy beside water.  The Silver Grass bears soft pink plumes in the fall.

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FLOWERING SHRUB OF THE WEEK

‘Blue Moon Wisteria”

An excellent way to add height and drama to your garden is with a vine on an arbor, trellis or along a fence.

The hardy Blue Moon Wisteria has a twining, trailing habit.  It’s 12 inch blue blooms have a sweet intense fragrance on a vigorous vine.  It requires full sun and should be mulched around the root zone in winter.

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GARDEN INVADERS

Striped Cucumber Beetles are more of a problem than ever, and we are seeing them earlier.  They not only feed on cucumber plants but also melons, squash and pumpkins.  This pesky little invader over winters in the adult stage under leaves or in dense grass, emerging in May or early June.  The adult is 5 mm long and is identified by its yellow and black striped wing cover.  The orange-yellow eggs are laid in the soil at the base of host plants.  Upon hatching, the larvae burrow into the soil and start to feed on roots.  Waves of new adult beetles can appear every three weeks.  Not only do they devour the plants, they are a carrier of bacterial wilt, so it’s best to practice crop rotation and do not plant in the same spot each year.

 Natural control measures including handpicking in the morning or evenings, but you have to be fast as they quickly fly or drop to the ground when disturbed.  Home gardeners may want to create yellow sticky traps as the beetles are drawn to the color yellow, or try using floating row covers.  Some gardeners have had some luck companion planting with radishes.  One of our employees had success with a vacuum and headlamp at night !!

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ELSPETH'S GARDEN CLASSROOM

Questions—yes, we answer lots of questions from gardeners. Elspeth delights in helping folks, so send along your tough questions. This week the question is:

 Watering plants—how much is enough?

 The optimal water requirement for plants grown in fields is ¾ to 1 inch, or 2-2.5 cm per week.

 Container grown plants have special requirements as the water evaporates quickly and they benefit from high quality potting soil which has better water retention properties. They should be checked daily particularly if in a sunny location.  The soil should be damp but not soaked.  Plant stems can rot from excessive watering.  Potted tomato plants should be watered from top and bottom by sitting the pot in a basin of water to ensure even watering.  This helps reduce the likelihood of the tomatoes developing blossom end rot.

 The best time to water plants is in the morning.  This provides an opportunity for any water droplets to dry. Sunshine can have a magnifying effect on the droplets causing the leaves to sunburn.  Leaving plant leaves wet during the night can encourage fungus growth like powdery mildew.

 Newly planted shrubs require deep watering that reaches 6 to 8 inches deep once a week to encourage a deep root growth, rather than frequent surface watering.  This can be achieved through a slow watering with a soaker hose or small steady stream from a regular hose.

 Elspeth

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RECIPE OF THE WEEK

Last week we hosted an event for NOW Lunenburg County in our greenhouse and decided to share the easy, make ahead menu.

  •  Fresh garden Gazpacho, a no cook refreshing puree of tomatoes and fresh vegetables and herbs.
  • Grilled Webber Garlic Knacker sausages with caramelized balsamic vinegar onions on our sweet rolls.
  • Accompaniments included our sauerkraut salad, Haskap chutney and grainy mustard.
  • The old fashioned vanilla ice cream sundae was topped with bananas, strawberries and chocolate sauce---Perfect for a hot summer afternoon!

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SUMMER INSPIRATION

No matter what walk of life or age we are, most of us wish for more time in the day.  But somehow,as the years go by we learn it’s not so critical that we try to tackle everything at once----it can be too overwhelming.  At the end of the day, even though you might put it on your to-do list, gardening is a stress reliever.  Even if you can just spend a few minutes at a time looking after a container or two of potted plants, it slows the world down around you, makes you focus on details and forces you to breathe—now how good is that for the soul?

Happy Summertime Everyone---Mary

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Past Market Newsletters

Please select from the following list to view recent past newsletters, or click here to view the full Market Newsletter archive.

Squashtastic Edition September 26, 2018
Autumn Days September 12, 2018
Labour Day Weekend Edition August 29, 2018
Wild About Blueberries August 15, 2018
August Joy August 1, 2017

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