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Welcome - Wile's Lake Farm Market Newsletter
eNewsletter issue 110 | June 25, 2008

Finally the bright, sunny days of summer have arrived, and with them, an abundance of summer fresh fruits and vegetables.  It’s time to indulge in the delicious produce at the market.

In This Issue:
Graduation Celebrations
Produce a Plenty
Canada Day
Question of the Week
Tetanus ALERT
What looks good this week

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Graduation Celebrations

Congratulations and best wishes to Rachel Peverill and Steven Clements who graduate June 25th from Parkview.  Rachel works at the Market on the front counter scooping ice cream and serving customers, two days a week during July and August she bakes with Joanne and Leonore.  She is off to Memorial University this fall.  Steven works at the farm but can often be seen mowing lawns, moving fertilizer and helping Peter around the Market.  Steven has worked for five years with us picking rocks, planting, making silage, milking cows and a whole assortment of farm jobs.  Steven is off to NS Community College in Halifax in September.  We are very pleased to have worked with these young folks, they are fabulous employees and we are proud of their accomplishments to date.  Good Luck!

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Produce a Plenty

We are pleased to announce a new supplier to the Market.  Cindy Rubinfine from Pleasant River.  Cindy will supply us with certified organically grown English cucumbers and cherry tomatoes.  She brought in samples earlier in the week and we devoured a pint of the wonderful cherry tomatoes in no time.  She has mixed four varieties in the pint box so there are red, orange and yellow tomatoes in each pint.  A wonderful assortment for a dip tray or in salads.  Cindy will be delivering on Thursdays.

We have the Walters family supplying us with their popular salad mixes—mesclun, spinach and arugula.  We sold these mixes last year and they were extremely popular, again an organically grown product.

We have Vermeulens asparagus from the Port Williams area.  Such a treat with a dab of butter!

Strawberries are plentiful this year.  Predictions are that there will be a big crop.  Our berries are picked daily for us by Charlie Jollimore.

Fill up your basket with Valley grown bunch beets, bunch carrots and romaine and leaf lettuce.  Things seem to have had an early start.  The showers of the last few days should really help bring things along in the garden……AH Summertime…..isn’t it wonderful!

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Canada Day

We’re breaking out the red and white—not to be missed is our Canada Day Breakfast, served from 8:30 until 11 am on Tuesday, July 1.  We will be flipping our homemade pancakes in the picnic area by the greenhouses.  There will be hot coffee and blueberry muffins available.  This is a really fun event for us, we see so many people and have a change to thank all of  you for your support.  The breakfast is free to all but we do accept free will donations to Harbour House, the women’s shelter in Bridgewater.

As usual we will have lots of Canada Day specials on shrubs and plants.

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Question of the Week

“What’s wrong with my forsythia, it didn’t bloom?  Last year it was lovely, this year it just turned green and stayed like that..”

            Forsythias bloom before they leaf out.  The distinctive yellow blossoms are one of the very first signs of spring in Lunenburg and Queens Counties.  Generally, this year the forsythias were spectacular with yellow blossoms stretching to the very tip of each branch. Forsythias bloom on the old wood so pruning should happen immediately after the blooming finishes.  Pruning early after the bloom encourages new growth and bud set for the following year.  Pruning later in the summer or in the early spring can reduce the bloom.

            If the forsythia is an old shrub it may need renovating.  The shrub can be rejuvenated over a three year period by removing one third of the branches each year.  The branches can be cut back by one-third or the total number of branches can be reduced by removing branches near the ground.  This requires some patience because it will take the forsythia several years to recover form the heavy pruning.  Few flowers will likely appear during this process.

            Finally, a late winter cold period, when the buds are set can reduce the number of flowers that appear.  This year’s snow cover and more moderate winter temperatures likely contributed to the great show of color in the spring.

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Tetanus ALERT

The local public health nurse dropped into the Market and left us some information about Tetanus. Tetanus or Lockjaw, is a serious illness caused from bacterial that is found naturally in soil, compost, animal feces, packaged potting mixtures and dust.  The bacterial can make a poison that causes you to become ill. Tetanus bacterial can enter the body through an open cut in the skin.  It does not pass form person to person.  Tetanus can cause painful spasms of the jaw muscles and painful muscle spasms throughout the body.  It can eventually lead to death.  Even with treatment the death rate is 10-20%. Adults over 60 years of age are at an increased risk of tetanus infection.

Vaccinations are the safest and most effective way to protect you against tetanus.  To protect yourself against tetanus wear gloves, protective footwear and clothing while gardening.  Clean wounds immediately with soap and water.  Ensure your vaccinations are up to date.  Canadians should receive a tetanus booster show every 10 years.  Tetanus vaccination is free in Nova Scotia every 10 years.  Contact your family doctor or visit the web –www.immunize.ca.

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What looks good this week

The Abbotswood Potentilla and Gold finger Potentilla are quite showy these days.  The Abbotswood mounds nicely and gets about 18” high and 3 feet wide.  The Gold finger Potentilla stands 4” high  when mature and blooms yellow blossoms off and on all summer.  The lilacs are still very pretty and Hydrangea are starting to bud up, so you can now see their shape and form.  Our roses are just starting to show some color but are loaded with buds so we expect Canada Day to have a nice “Rose Show”.

Long hours of daylight, summer breezes and steamy heat—Mother Nature is treating us to all three since the arrival of summer.  Already people are taking long weekends and starting holidays.  Here at the Market we are looking forward to a very busy weekend---happy trails and safe driving to all.

Happy Canada Day everyone…Mary

Our e-newsletter is prepared weekly by Wiles Lake Farm Market and offers timely tips and gardening information relevant to our local area and the latest Market information.  We hope you enjoy it and find it useful.  Feel free to tell your friends and encourage them to sign up to receive our next issue.

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Past Market Newsletters

Please select from the following list to view recent past newsletters, or click here to view the full Market Newsletter archive.

Squashtastic Edition September 26, 2018
Autumn Days September 12, 2018
Labour Day Weekend Edition August 29, 2018
Wild About Blueberries August 15, 2018
August Joy August 1, 2017

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